Month: February 2015

Baby Portrait in Gouache

cousin-portrait-gouacheI had a breakthrough in painting this week, mixing more colors and getting more of a sense of the brush. There are still things I struggled with, but this was turned out much better than I thought and it’ll be a surprise for my cousin and her husband.

I was also searching this past week for creative commons sources for reference photos and I found a nice site called Paint My Photo which has a lot of high resolution photos of animals, landscapes, and portraits that I’ll definitely use. The site brings artists and photographers and each enjoys the other’s work.

I think I’m going to tackle another interesting bird for my next work.

Blue Kangaroo and Coopers Hawk

2015-02-22 10.06.22-Coopers-Hawkblue-kangaroo-krister-finalHere’s  blue kangaroo that I finished from my trip to the zoo. I found out that I’m probably using too little water and paint in my gouache. I had assumed that letting the paint dry up was fine as it can be reconstituted with water, but I found out that that’s not the case. I’m working on a portrait now and hope to have something to show soon.

I’m color mixing more now.

This beautiful Cooper’s hawk was on our neighbor’s roof this morning. Coopers and sharp-shinned hawks are pretty similar except I think this is a Cooper because of his big head. Here’s a close up of his head. I wish I had a little larger zoom lens, but this was still pretty cool.coopers-hawk-closeup

Painting the Unseen – Rene Magritte’s La Liberateur

I’ve been a fan of Magritte since I was a kid (see Halloween costume, bottom), so I jumped at the chance to write on Magritte’s La Liberateur for my weekly Comp assignment. The assignment was to first describe the work so that someone who hadn’t seen it could picture it, then to do a formal analysis.  (An aside: Still painting every day, but nothing to share yet)

Magritte-La-Liberateur“The mind loves the unknown. It loves images whose meaning is unknown, since the meaning of the mind itself is unknown.” – Rene Magritte

René Magritte’s 1947 painting Le Liberateur is a bold depiction of the subconscious mind. The subject of this painting (fig. 1) is a seated figure wearing a straw hat, a bright red shawl, a neatly-tailored pair of trousers, and a pair of black leather shoes. His head and torso have been replaced with a card or parchment with 4 silhouettes on it, similar to the traditional “4 of clubs” design: a key, a goblet, a dove or pigeon in flight, and a tobacco pipe. His left hand rests on the handle of a bamboo cane; his right hand carries a strange object consisting of an elaborate, symmetrical, pearl-inlaid structure which has the eyes and mouth of a beautiful woman, attached to a large grey base similar to the base of a candelabra. The man rests on a rock formation by a dirt path, and a standard brown leather suitcase lies on the ground by his right foot.

Behind the figure is a lush, wooded landscape with a winding river. In the upper half of the painting, the sky is fragmented into numerous blocky arches, which retain the colors and gradient of a daytime sky. Cumulus clouds of various sizes drift through the arches. Behind the arches, a starry night sky is visible, yet the lighting on the other elements in the painting (the background, the figure, etc.) comes from the sunlit sky seen on the arches.

At first glance, the painting might seem completely absurd or nonsensical. The viewer is treated to multiple unexplained images that are at once familiar and unfamiliar. Human figures are combined with inanimate objects, the sky is at once daytime and nighttime, and seemingly unrelated visual signifiers are combined in ways that suggest relationships.

To better understand Le Liberateur, and Magritte’s work in general, it is important to recognize that painting was made at a time when society was increasingly influenced by the neurologist Sigmund Freud’s theories of the subconscious. René Magritte was a member of the Surrealist movement, a group of artists and intellectuals, founded by André Breton, who wished to explore how the mind could be trained into new forms of creativity.

Attempting to represent the workings of the subconscious presents unique challenges, as the subconscious is, by definition, not consciously perceived. Magritte used several visual tactics in order to represent the subconscious. One tactic is the use of recurring imagery. Several of the specific combinations of imagery in Le Liberateur turn up in other Magritte paintings; variations of the central figure are the focus of Magritte’s Le Therapeute series of paintings,[1] [2] while the pearly face is the subject of his Scheherazade series of paintings, [3] [4] and appears in his 1947 painting Les Grands Rendez-vous,[5] which also contains the same four symbols as seen on the “body” of the central figure in Le Liberateur. Other recurring images are less specific, and occur in many different permutations throughout Magritte’s work: doves/pigeons (e.g. Clairvoyance (1936),[6] Le Retour (1940),[7] Night of Love (1947),[8] Man in a Bowler Hat (1964),[9] etc.), tobacco pipes (e.g. La Lampe Philosophique (1936),[10] La Trahison des Images (1948),[11] The Cripple (c. 1948),[12] La Bonne Foi (1965),[13] etc.) and cumulus clouds in blue skies (e.g. Le Faux Miroir (1928),[14] Megalomania (1948),[15] Les Valeurs Personnelles (1952),[16] Decalcomania (1966),[17] etc.). The combinations of the seemingly unrelated familiar objects also evokes the workings of the subconscious mind; it illustrates how it is able to form connections between concepts and events that are not immediately obvious to the conscious mind.

In closing, I feel that Magritte was at least partially successful in conveying how the subconscious mind can affect our understanding of reality. Examining Magritte’s work in detail encouraged me to think about how the subconscious mind can form complex connections between various life experiences. And, in keeping with the original mission of the Surrealists, it made me consider how I can harness my subconscious mind to help fuel my conscious creativity.

[1] Various, “The Therapeutist I,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-therapeutist-1937

[2] Various, “The Therapeutist II,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-therapeutist

[3] Various, “Scheherazade I,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/sheherazade

[4] Various, “Scheherazade II,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/sheherazade-1950

[5] Author unknown, “Les grands rendez-vous: René Magritte Auction,” Artnet, date last    modified unknown, http://www.artnet.com/artists/ren%C3%A9-magritte/les-grands-     rendez-vous-qU09Ypet55WMizD8Rrvn3g2.

[6] Various, “Clairvoyance,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/clairvoyance-self-portrait-1936

[7] Various, “The Return,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-return-1940

[8] Various, “Night of Love,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/not_detected_211392

[9] Various, “Man in a Bowler Hat,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/man-in-a-bowler-hat-1964

[10] Various, “The Philosopher’s Lamp,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/philosopher-s-lamp-1936

[11] Various, “The Treachery of Images,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-treachery-of-images-this-is-not-a-pipe-1948

[12] Various, “The Maimed,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-maimed

[13] Various, “Good Faith,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/good-faith-1965

[14] Various, “The False Mirror,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/the-false-mirror-1928

[15] Various, “Delusions of Grandeur,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/delusions-of-grandeur-1948

[16] Various, “Personal Values,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/personal-values-1952

[17] Various, “Decalcomania,” WikiArt, February 14, 2015, http://www.wikiart.org/en/rene-magritte/decalcomania-1966

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Dinotopia Artist James Gurney, Photo References, and Maquette Magic

James Gurney has a great blog, Gurney Journey james-gurney-2with great resources for how he learns to paint imaginary characters with life-like weighting, color, and balance. He uses references photos extensively to help him figure out feel the emotions of the characters in his pictures.

From Riding a Pterosaur: James-Gurney-Reference

“The idea is to get into the spirit of the action, feel the wind in your face and hear the screech of the pterosaur.

I think that’s more important than getting a photographically real piece of reference to copy. If you can identify with the weight and balance of things, and especially the emotion, you’ve got 90% of the problem solved.”


Gallery Visit Today – Artist Lynda Lowe

lynda-lowe-2lynda-lowe-1I visited a neat solo exhibition today – Lynda Lowe at Abmeyer + Wood near Pike Place Market in Seattle. She had beautiful mixed media pieces with watercolor, oil, and wax on wood. The title of the show was Resonance and her figures of birds or objects seemed to resonate from mathematical symbols and scaffolding. The gallery told me that she’s a local artist.

We also visited the Patricia Rovzar Gallery. I especially liked some of the artwork there made out of ‘found’ materials. I’m going to try and visit galleries more on a regular basis.

A Bird in the Hand

Baby Bird in Hand

Baby Bird in the Hand

More baby birds learning to fly in our backyard.  This little guy smacked himself hard on a window. He had a happy ending though.

He was stunned for about 10 minutes, then he flew off to the trees. I know researching bird strikes that it helps for them to be kept upright (otherwise they can suffocate on their sides). I didn’t want to leave him on the deck as we also have visiting crows, and crows can attack stunned birds like this.

He was very light and seemed like he wanted to stay in my hand.

Lascaux Cave Paintings – RMCAD Art History

Lascaux Cave PaintingsArt History class started out with a discussion about whether the Paleolithic cave paintings in Lascaux should be considered art. I was surprised that people could think it was a contemporary notion to think it was art because of the care that was taken in the creation of the paintings, and how hard it must have been to collect the materials. There is also an aesthetic quality to the paintings that for me transcends the time.

lascaux

Apparently, there are some new theories about how scientific principles may have been conveyed in paintings, but I also thought that didn’t preclude their still being considered works of art. Scientific illustration is enjoyed for both its art and its scientific information. A great example is Ernst Haeckel.

Ernst Haeckel Scientific Illustration

References:
3D Visit to Lascaux Cave
Lascaux photos
Ernst Haeckel

Art Therapy and Healing Soldiers – National Geographic

Masks and Trauma of WarYesterday I came across a powerful National Geographic article that described how art therapy was helping soldiers with the emotional and physical scars of war.

Excerpt:

I THOUGHT THIS WAS A JOKE,” recalled Staff Sgt. Perry Hopman, who served as a flight medic in Iraq. “I wanted no part of it because, number one, I’m a man, and I don’t like holding a dainty little paintbrush. Number two, I’m not an artist. And number three, I’m not in kindergarten. Well, I was ignorant, and I was wrong, because it’s great. I think this is what started me kind of opening up and talking about stuff and actually trying to get better.”

Hopman is one of many service members guided by art therapist Melissa Walker at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), which is part of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Maryland. Images painted on their masks symbolize themes such as death, physical pain, and patriotism.”

It’s a powerful piece and a great program at Walter Reed.

hopman

Bird in Flight – Value Study in Gouache

Bird in Flight - Krister EideA few days ago a flock of sparrows with their fledglings descended onto our feeder. It was a very noisy and many of the baby birds were just learning to fly so there was a lot of bumping going on. sparrows

Sometimes the camera would catch a mother bird hovering and feeding one of the babies.

The camera really helps me capture birds and other animals mid-movement so I can study them and paint them later.

I’m going to try a paint every day. I’m getting a much better sense of rendering with a brush vs. pencil.