Month: November 2015

Drawing to Tell a Story

emmeline-color2

thumbs1As much as I liked traditional atelier instruction like at the Gage Academy, I’ve really wanted to get more experience drawing imaginatively and using drawing to tell stories. One great exercise we had to do in my Mastering the Pencil class at RMCAD last quarter was drawing multiple thumbnails to tell a story.

The prompt was an old suitcase. We had to make a story out of it. Here are some thumbnails sketching out potential thumbs2characters, locations, and sequences. From the brainstorm, I created an Agatha Christie Miss Marple-like character, Emmeline Duck who solves mysteries like the suitcase at the bottom of Bolger Pond.

Last week when I was writing a paper on the great illustrator Howard Pyle, I was struck by this quote from him: “If the first sketch looks like the one I want to do, to make sure—I always make the other forty-nine anyway.”

Balancing Swallows and Horatio Shrew

horatio-mowburntFullSizeRender (2)
Here’s a final project from my 3D design class. We had to create a balancing sculpture and I balanced a mama barn swallow made out of sculpey clay on a baby. I’m glad it worked! I chose to use sculpey, because I know a lot of 2D artists use sculpey to make maquettes that help them with composition and lighting.

FullSizeRender (1)

Also instead of the Windy Shrews (see my prior Balderdash assignment post), I decided the final Mowburnt project  would be a burnt sort of elephant shrew who thought he was Horatio Hornblower.

 

My classes this quarter are History of American Illustration and Typography. I’ll update more soon.

Singer Sargent at the Met

Great exhibition at the NY Met Museum last month – Singer Sargent and Friends. Not that I’m paint more, I learn much more from seeing original works up close. It was an amazing exhibition because of the range of styles  that he painted in. My photos don’t do the art justice, but since the exhbit has now ended, some of you might enjoy seeing the work.

I liked this portrait of Robert Louis Stevenson and his wife. Apparently Stevenson was a restless person who often paced, so Sargent caught him mid-stride.

IMG_6402FullSizeRender
This beautiful panel was a study of a larger work .
I found this portrait an interesting study too because he masterfully drew a viewer’s gaze to the face. There was only a very general suggestion of the piano keys so as not to draw attention away from the center of focus.

IMG_6378 sargent-singer IMG_6382