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Drawing Horses, Elephants, Primates, and More

We’re continuing to draw our way through the animal kingdom. Each week’s assignment follows the same pattern – block out the geometric shapes, then draw animal gestures. We’re also doing a skeleton study and ecorche / muscle drawing, so it’s busy. Having done an ecorche for each group helps in making a fantasy hybrid animal (WIP). These are just a few of the sketches from the past weeks.

 

 

Big Cats – Animal Anatomy and Drawing

I had my first week of Animal Anatomy and Drawing and the assignments were all on Big Cats. Last week I also had a chance to go to Cougar Mountain, a small zoo in Issaquah. We shot some nice photo reference, though.

The first assignment was to break down the animals into 3D geometric shapes. It was a bit hard at first, but I can see that it helps simplify and visualizes the 3D forms when you see them in the live animals. The idea of drawing the envelope is to get the general shape of the animal or figure before working on details. Here are some of my gesture drawings. For me, it’s easier working out the forms when watching a video loop of animals moving. The book for the course is Joe Weatherly’s Drawing Animals. We also had to do skeleton and ecorche versions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moorehead and Doubleday – Rabbits and More

Meet Moorehead (left) and Doubleday (right). They’re a work in progress. I haven’t completely decided their back story yet. The sketch was colored in with CarbOthello pastel pencils (I like them) on Canson Mi Teintes paper. I just got a pack of La Carte and also Sennelier soft pastels and will be experimenting with those too.

I’m going to take a one day pastels workshop with Janis Graves this weekend through Cole Gallery and looking forward to it. I’ll paste a sample of her art below.

Janis-Graves-birdsThe Guild of Natural Science Illustrators also posted the group mural that I worked on at the Santa Cruz Conference.

There were 3. Here’s the one I drew a little egret (corner right) catching a fish. It’s on exhibit at the Sanctuary Exploration Center that’s part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. It was a great conference.

 

 

 

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More Drawing

Screen Shot 2016-07-01 at 8.43.31 AMI dropped my Hornblower in the Crisis of at the Washington State Convention Center on Wednesday and got a sneak peek at other work that will be on display from the Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators now until September 30th. It’s a fantastic show and I’m honored to have work in it. We’re going to go down tomorrow with our family and my grandparents and take it all it. There’s also a Meet the Illustrators and Family Draw Along September 17th which I know will be great.

crow-hatArt History III is over for me now and it’s nice to get more drawing together. The past week I’ve been trying out new methods of adding color to my pencil drawings. This crow (we like crows in house) was based on an old photo of Fred Astaire.

I’m trying watercolor, colored pencil, and pastel over printed versions from the Artisan 1430 printer.

My new course this quarter is Life Drawing IV. It feels good to be working in traditional media again. I’m also started working with charcoal powder for the first time. It’s  messy, but I really like what can be done with a light touch. I’m also seeing what a difference it makes using a fine grade of charcoal paper.

eide_SkullStudies3Here’s a skull that was this week’s homework. This holiday weekend I’m going to be traveling down to Monterey for the annual meeting of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Looking forward to it! It’ll be my first art conference. Jack Laws is one of the keynotes. I admire both of their work.

Childrens Illustrator Jerry Pinkney at Michelson Gallery in MA

lionMy parents were on the East Coast to give some talks at Landmark College in Vermont. They stopped in at the R. Michelson Gallery in Massachusetts, a gallery famous for its children’s book illustration.

Here are some great photos of watercolor work by Caldecott Award winner Jerry Pinkney. They knew of him because he had talked about his dyslexia, but we’re all familiar with his beautiful animal work. There’s a lot to be inspired about in his work  – dynamic composition, expressiveness, and brushwork. It’s especially helpful to see the works close up because I could see how he combined pencil and watercolor in a way that looked effortless.

I hope to post more of my own work soon. I’m doing more sketches of the Snow Queen with the iPad Pro and Apple pencil but nothing to show yet. I recently read a new translation of the Snow Queen by Hans Christian Anderson. It’s very different any of film adaptations. I’m setting my illustrations in Sweden because my father’s side is mostly  from Sweden and Norway.

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Painting with Procreate and Corel Painter

imageI’m starting to noodle around more with digital art programs since I got a iPad Pro and Apple Pencil last weekend. It’s great.

I just started learning the programs, but colored a pencil sketch and can see the potential.

I can see why many artists are raving . My Cintiq cable died (its awkward 3-headed connector) and the company is out of all replacements – and they can’t be bought anywhere else.

iPad Pro + Apple Pencil CAN connect to a computer using the Astropad app – which makes the process freeing. I used Corel Painter and have also started working with Procreate which is an amazing app for $5.99.

Krister-Eide-Clymer-Museum-GNSIAt RMCAD, it’s Art History III (Modern) this month but also had a great time at the opening of our Nature’s Call show at the Clymer Museum (my work is part of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Northwest). It runs through June 25th and they’ll have another First Friday event in June if you might want to visit.

Earlier this month I also had a chance to attend a meeting of the Society for Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators – Western Washington at Seattle Pacific.  That was a great experience. They start off with videos filmed in the artists’ studio (I’ll post Jessixa’s  and Doug’s below) and then they answer questions. I liked seeing how their illustrations evolved.

 

 

 

Owl and Frog Ink Illustration

Just finished this – it’s my last week in Basic Illustration. It’s been a great class. It’s been a learning curve going to ink from pencil. The assignment was to choose a fortune cookie fortune and make a drawing from it. My fortune was “You are wise to keep your eyes open at all times.”

We weren’t allowed to use ink washes so it was a change for me as I had to focus on line art.

The ink drawing was first done in pencil then inked using micron pens, a Lamy fountain pen, and a little Copic marker for blocking in the grass. I also use Duralar mylar which helped a lot with my learning curve for ink. Duralar is very forgiving with ink – because it erases cleanly with alcohol or the colorless Copic marker blender.

My pencil draft is below.

Krister-Owl-Frog-Pencil-Final

Book of Wonder Illustrator Sidney Sime

Sidney-SimeEvery week, the class assignment is to have each person suggest an illustration or group of illustrations based on the reading. For the chapter on tone, I chose this 1912 illustration by Sidney Sime (1867 – 1941) for Lord Dunsany’s The Book of Wonder. I chose it partly because it has some similarities, in terms of subject matter, value range, and atmosphere, to my own project for this week. I also chose it because it effectively uses various value and compositional elements, including a chiaroscuro technique, to guide the viewer’s eye throughout the piece. The first major area of light starts at the upper left corner, then trails around, almost like a curving road, to the first major subject, the city in the rocks. In turn, the curved shape of the light/shadow pattern and the diagonal lines of the rock lead into the menacing blackness filled with eyes under the bridge. The smoky shape at right helps to transition the viewer down to the next major subject, the man on the winged beast.

Imagine what the piece would look like without the large shadowy area at left. It would lose some of its atmosphere, with the impression of discovering something grand and menacing in a dark, obscure region.  In addition, the black space filled with eyes under the bridge would be less clear as a main subject of the piece, since the chiaroscuro patterns of light and dark have the area immediately above as the brightest spot in the composition.

Bunny Deep Sea Explorer and Jules Verne

bunny-sea-Krister-EideHere’s my pencil illustration for the the thumbnail I previously uploaded. I went with the underwater city. I took some of my inspiration loosely from those great Jules Verne books, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, and all the vintage diver stories. I’ll also post my inked / copic tone marker version at the bottom. Ink and copic markers are new media for me. I also am working on Mylar / Dura-lar, which is helpful for making frequent revisions, especially with ink.


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Illustration!

Finally!  Basic Illustration this quarter with a lot of my fellow illustration majors at Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design. The assigned book is James Gurney’s Imaginative Realism: How to Paint What Doesn’t Exist – a book that I’ve checked out from the library several times before. The assignment this week was pretty open, make drawings with animals doing human things. We start with thumbnails (these only about 3 inches long) that allow us to play with different scenes and perspectives. I did a few with an underwater rabbit, then other storylines (elephant tailor, storytelling stork with ferrets around a campfire, and then some others like a kangaroo and gazelle dancing and fox and mole golfing. It’s already what I do in my spare time.

Next step is a value study, then texture, transfer to mylar, and ink finish. The one I’m taking to final is the underwater bunny discovering a lost city. I thought it would be good for me to work more on environments.

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