children

By the Light of the Moon – Pastel Painting

I had a great time in a 1-day pastel workshop at the Cole Art Studio. I used Nupastels on LaCarte paper for this painting of a dik dik, a small antelope that lives in Africa.  I worked on this in the afternoon.

HornbillIn the morning, I painted an African hornbill.

Pastels seem almost effortless. I’m looking forward to doing more.

Coloring Drawings and More from the SCBWI Exhibit in Seattle

I’m experimenting more with different ways to color drawings. The IpadPro, Apple Pencil, and the $5.99 app  Procreate make the process more like traditional painting.

Screen Shot 2016-07-10 at 11.05.52 AMAt left is my original homework assignment Mastering the Pencil.

By printing, I can also use traditional media like watercolor and pastel and not have to worry about destroying the original.

I also wanted to post some of the beautiful work at the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators exhibit that’s open at the Washington State Convention Center until September.

The artists are, respectively, Kelly Patton, Jessixa Bagley, and Hannah Stephens.

fox-woodbixley-kite

snow-queen-scbwi

 

 

Society of Children’s Book Illustrators Exhibit in July – I’m In

horatio-color3I just heard today that Hornblower During the Crisis has been accepted in the SCBWI Western Washington Illustrators Exhibit at the Washington State Convention Center! This will be my first juried group exhibition. It  runs from July 1- September 30th. I also just dropped off  some art for the Best of the Gage Exhibition. The exhibition and sale there is June 17th, and of course the Clymer Museum exhibition goes through June 25th.

In addition to school, I’ve been experimenting with different ways of adding color. This past week I did some colored pencil work with the black and white owl and frog drawing. I like really like Faber-Castell Polychromos. They are oil-based, so blend with baby oil and can work side-by-side with watercolor paints or pencils.

Krister-Eide-Frog-Owl-Colored-Pencils-2crowI’ve also been doing some sketching and thinking about doing some illustrations for Hans Christian Anderson’s Snow Queen. There are two good crow characters that are part of the story so I thought it would be nice to do. We get a lot of crow visitors in the backyard.

I also saw an inspiring video today. Sargy Mann is a painter who became blind when he was his 30’s. See his story below.

 

Painting with Procreate and Corel Painter

imageI’m starting to noodle around more with digital art programs since I got a iPad Pro and Apple Pencil last weekend. It’s great.

I just started learning the programs, but colored a pencil sketch and can see the potential.

I can see why many artists are raving . My Cintiq cable died (its awkward 3-headed connector) and the company is out of all replacements – and they can’t be bought anywhere else.

iPad Pro + Apple Pencil CAN connect to a computer using the Astropad app – which makes the process freeing. I used Corel Painter and have also started working with Procreate which is an amazing app for $5.99.

Krister-Eide-Clymer-Museum-GNSIAt RMCAD, it’s Art History III (Modern) this month but also had a great time at the opening of our Nature’s Call show at the Clymer Museum (my work is part of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Northwest). It runs through June 25th and they’ll have another First Friday event in June if you might want to visit.

Earlier this month I also had a chance to attend a meeting of the Society for Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators – Western Washington at Seattle Pacific.  That was a great experience. They start off with videos filmed in the artists’ studio (I’ll post Jessixa’s  and Doug’s below) and then they answer questions. I liked seeing how their illustrations evolved.

 

 

 

Book of Wonder Illustrator Sidney Sime

Sidney-SimeEvery week, the class assignment is to have each person suggest an illustration or group of illustrations based on the reading. For the chapter on tone, I chose this 1912 illustration by Sidney Sime (1867 – 1941) for Lord Dunsany’s The Book of Wonder. I chose it partly because it has some similarities, in terms of subject matter, value range, and atmosphere, to my own project for this week. I also chose it because it effectively uses various value and compositional elements, including a chiaroscuro technique, to guide the viewer’s eye throughout the piece. The first major area of light starts at the upper left corner, then trails around, almost like a curving road, to the first major subject, the city in the rocks. In turn, the curved shape of the light/shadow pattern and the diagonal lines of the rock lead into the menacing blackness filled with eyes under the bridge. The smoky shape at right helps to transition the viewer down to the next major subject, the man on the winged beast.

Imagine what the piece would look like without the large shadowy area at left. It would lose some of its atmosphere, with the impression of discovering something grand and menacing in a dark, obscure region.  In addition, the black space filled with eyes under the bridge would be less clear as a main subject of the piece, since the chiaroscuro patterns of light and dark have the area immediately above as the brightest spot in the composition.

Painting Portraits – the Grisaille Approach

I finished my watercolor portrait workshop with Hamid at Gage Academy this past week, but I still wanted to learn more, so I checked out Scott Waddell‘s  Art of the Painting video. It’s great!  His demo is for oil, but most of his principles work for all classical painting. He starts off ‘posterizing’ the major lights and darks, establishes the values, then shifts into conceptualizing mode, carving the face in 3D in color. I found the method straightforward and much simpler than just trying take in all the information at once. Scott supplements his painting with video illustrations of the behavior of light on 3D surfaces.

Here are 2 portraits that are more exercises  / WIP rather than finished works. The girl is from this 1966/1967 film adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Snow Queen.  I still have more I would like to do on that piece, but the RMCAD school year starts up in a week, and I’m going to see if I can learn more about composition before then.

krister-portrait-man krister-portrait-snow-queen

Society of the Spectacle and a Social Advertising Campaign

For this week’s RMCAD ACAD1000 assignment, we were supposed to critically read Guy Debord’s The Society of the Spectacle and pose a question based on the theme of the work. The following is what I wrote.

The example I used was an interesting social ad campaign trying to reach out to children who were the victim of physical abuse. The Spectacle paper clearly made points about the negative side of ‘spectacles’ and visual appearances, but imagery can also redirect people at reality and have positive effects on society.

Guy Debord’s The Society of the Spectacle discusses the negative effects that imagery propagated by capitalist culture can have on people and society. However, there have been campaigns for good causes that have used the same tactics.

Recently, an advertising campaign created by the Spanish organization Aid to Children and Adolescents at Risk Foundation created an illusory image that was designed to empower children who are the victims of child abuse. When a normally-sized adult looks at the ad, they would only see an image of a child and the phrase “Sometimes, child abuse is only visible to the child suffering it.” However, if a child or anyone shorter than 4 feet 5 inches looks at the ad, they would see: “If somebody hurts you, phone us and we’ll help you.”

http://gizmodo.com/this-ad-has-a-secret-anti-abuse-message-that-only-kids-493108460

Do you believe that the tools of the spectacle can be used for good? If so, can you name any examples? If not, can you explain why you believe so?