maquettes

Sketching Scenes with Maquettes

maquetteIn Concept Illustration, we have an assignment to design an illustration based on the broad theme of conflict (character vs character, character vs. environment etc). I’ve thought about doing illustrations from the original Snow Queen so on our thumbnail assignment, which was limited to black and white and approximately 1 x 2 inches.

I’ve always been inspired with James Gurney’s maquette work (here is his Skybax maquette made out of armature wire, sculpey, floral wire, and stockings covered with latex among other ingredients.

gurney-skybax-maquetteI liked being able to walk around the scene and vary the perspective – vertically and horizontally. I used armature wire and chavant clay which doesn’t harden.

I also had to have 2 color comps and three 3-color value sketches. My instructor picked thumbnail 3 so that’s the one I’m working on, but with more background added.

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snow-queen-thumbs

Our discussion this past week was to collect illustrations that could be used as inspiration for creating your scene. I picked these great works by Sendak, Lathrop, and Dulac.

sendak

 

 

lathrop

 

 

 

 

 

dulac

 

Veggie Circus – Scene Diorama to Pencil

Krister-Veggie-Circus-drawingMy teacher in Mastering the Pencil this quarter is children’s book illustrator Karen Windness. We had a fun assignment this past week creating a veggie or fruit circus using the real items in a diorama that would serve as a model for a pencil scene. I went to a Chinese market (lots of things looked like they could be characters in a circus) and picked out a sweet potato that looked like an elephant.

It was good to have a physical model to work Diorama-maquettes-drawingwith to work out the placement of characters, lighting, and background elements. Here’s my sweet potato with ginger arms and legs. Here’s my drawing that I’ll submit today. I used some graphite powder for shading (Creatacolor better than General’s).